Cloud investment will create 14 million jobs worldwide

Cloud investment will create 14 million jobs worldwide
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Spending on public and private cloud services is predicted to generate almost 14 million jobs worldwide between 2011 and 2015, according to a new report from IDC.

The study, carried out in association with Microsoft, predicted that around half of these new positions would be created in China and India.

More than one-third of cloud-enabled jobs will occur in the communications and media, banking, and discrete manufacturing industries.

The report also estimated that the total amount spent on cloud last year was $28bn, compared to an overall IT spend of $1.7 trillion.

Lower IT and business process costs driven by the economies of scale in infrastructure and talent of cloud computing also free up funds for new business investment, it said. By 2015, increased business revenue as a direct result of cloud-driven innovation could $1.1 reach trillion annually.

“The cloud is going to have a huge impact on job creation,” says Susan Hauser, Microsoft corporate vice president of the Worldwide Enterprise and Partner Group. “It’s a transformative technology that will drive down costs, spur innovation, and open up new jobs and skillsets across the globe.”

The report, “Cloud Computing & Worldwide Job Creation”, shows businesses that move to the cloud are freeing up time and money to invest in innovation and job creation.

“For most organizations, cloud computing should be a no-brainer, given its ability to increase IT innovation and flexibility, lower capital costs, and help generate revenues that are multiples of spending,” said John F. Gantz, chief research officer and senior vice president at IDC.

“A common misperception is cloud computing is a job eliminator, but in truth it will be a job creator — a major one. And job growth will occur across continents and throughout organizations of all sizes because emerging markets, small cities and small businesses have the same access to cloud benefits as large enterprises or developed nations.”

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